“a philosophy of personal ethics which is informed by its system of logic and its views on the natural world. According to its teachings, as social beings, the path to happiness for humans is found in accepting this moment as it presents itself, by not allowing ourselves to be controlled by our desire for pleasure or our fear of pain, by using our minds to understand the world around us and to do our part in nature’s plan, and by working together and treating others in a fair and just manner.”

In some ways Stoicism was a product of its’ time – life could be blatantly unfair and dangerous – slavery, disease, war, violence could all make life unpleasant or end it all together. However, amongst all of this, hard work and grit could help people succeed, – slaves could become prosperous free men for example. The principles of Stoicism described above are applicable to the modern as well as the ancient world. No matter what happens to us, the only choice is to move forward, and hard work, reason and trying to make positive changes in our lives and those of others seems the most sensible way forward to me.

There is a lot more to Stoic philosophy than I have covered here. I currently have “Meditations” by Marcus Aurelius, a noted Stoic, on my desk to read and Derren Brown’s book “Happy – Why More or Less Everything is Absolutely Fine” has a good section and discussion on Stoicism. (His book is another one of the list I thinks I would like to write about).