Stoic Philosophy in 5 minutes

Stoic philosophy (Stoicism) flourished amongst Romans and Greeks until about the 3rd century. If I had to sum it up in a single sentence it would be

Shit happens, and when you can’t do anything about it, look for the best way to improve the situation

A slightly more elegant way of putting it is in what is known as the Serenity prayer

Lord, grant me the Serenity to accept things I cannot change;

Courage to change the things I can;

And the Wisdom to know the difference.

Wikipedia sums Stoicism up rather well as

“a philosophy of personal ethics which is informed by its system of logic and its views on the natural world. According to its teachings, as social beings, the path to happiness for humans is found in accepting this moment as it presents itself, by not allowing ourselves to be controlled by our desire for pleasure or our fear of pain, by using our minds to understand the world around us and to do our part in nature’s plan, and by working together and treating others in a fair and just manner.”

In some ways Stoicism was a product of its’ time – life could be blatantly unfair and dangerous – slavery, disease, war, violence could all make life unpleasant or end it all together. However, amongst all of this, hard work and grit could help people succeed, – slaves could become prosperous free men for example. The principles of Stoicism described above are applicable to the modern as well as the ancient world. No matter what happens to us, the only choice is to move forward, and hard work, reason and trying to make positive changes in our lives and those of others seems the most sensible way forward to me.

There is a lot more to Stoic philosophy than I have covered here. I currently have “Meditations” by Marcus Aurelius, a noted Stoic, on my desk to read and Derren Brown’s book “Happy – Why More or Less Everything is Absolutely Fine” has a good section and discussion on Stoicism. (His book is another one of the list I thinks I would like to write about).

 

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About Eudaimonium

Eudaimonium is a concept often associated with Greek philosopher Aristotle, and most accurately translates as “human flourishing”. This concept was core to Aristotelian philosophy which explored how to maximise human flourishing/happiness. It is a concept that strongly resonated with me the first time I read about, and understood, it.

If you google “eudaimonium” you will most likely find the term “eudaimonia” come up first. This is the plural form of eudaimonium. I have purposely chosen to use the term eudaimonium in naming this website, because while there are many common features in what makes us happy as human beings, we all flourish under slightly different conditions. In life you need to find your own path – what I offer are some general guidelines based on my experience.

This website comes from over thirty years of me trying to understand what makes use flourish. It started for me as a socially awkward teenager – What was the purpose of life? How did/could I fit in? What did success mean for me?┬áThen as an educator, what was the best way to help my students flourish? Finally as someone now responsible for the development of the teams I work with, how do I help them flourish?

Over the past 35 years I have read broadly to try and answer these questions. This has included studying and reflecting on a wide range of topics including communication, leadership, negotiation, psychology, leadership and happiness. Because eudaimonia varies from individual to individual, you may not agree with everything I write, but hopefully it will provoke some helpful thoughts and reflections. Given the thousands of hours I have spent studying these topics, and applying them where I can, I hope at least I will be able to save you some time. I will be as concise as possible, and will include references to other resources for topics you find interesting and wish to find more information on.

I recommend you start with the Main Topics menu to get a feel for what this site covers.

 

Note – I started this website/blog on 1 January 2018, so it is still in its early stages. I will try and add content as quickly as possible.